If you pick up Richland Woman Blues remembering Maria Muldaur's erotic recording of the song with Jim Kweskin's Jug Band, you may be surprised at how her voice has changed, and yet how impossible it is to mistake her for anyone else. She can still negotiate the leaps and slides that seductively shaded the original "Richland Woman Blues" or "Midnight at the Oasis", but her voice is deeper and she commands a rasping growl-characteristics eminently suitable for the blues and gospel songs assembled here. The album's inspiration was a visit to the grave of the great guitar-playing blueswoman Memphis Minnie, and she selects four of her songs, two as conversational duets with Alvin Youngblood Hart and two with the artful guitar of Roy Rogers.
If you pick up Richland Woman Blues remembering Maria Muldaur's erotic recording of the song with Jim Kweskin's Jug Band, you may be surprised at how her voice has changed, and yet how impossible it is to mistake her for anyone else. She can still negotiate the leaps and slides that seductively shaded the original "Richland Woman Blues" or "Midnight at the Oasis", but her voice is deeper and she commands a rasping growl-characteristics eminently suitable for the blues and gospel songs assembled here. The album's inspiration was a visit to the grave of the great guitar-playing blueswoman Memphis Minnie, and she selects four of her songs, two as conversational duets with Alvin Youngblood Hart and two with the artful guitar of Roy Rogers.
772532127028
Richland Woman Blues
Artist: Maria Muldaur
Format: CD
New: Available 15.99
Wish

Available Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. Richland Women Blues
2. Grasshoppers in My Pillow
3. It's a Blessing
4. Me & My Chauffeur Blues
5. Put It Right Here
6. I'm Goin' Back Home
7. My Man Blues
8. In My Girlish Days
9. Far Away Blues
10. I Got to Move
11. Lonesome Desert Blues
12. Soul of a Man
13. I Belong to That Band
14. It's a Blessing (Reprise)

More Info:

If you pick up Richland Woman Blues remembering Maria Muldaur's erotic recording of the song with Jim Kweskin's Jug Band, you may be surprised at how her voice has changed, and yet how impossible it is to mistake her for anyone else. She can still negotiate the leaps and slides that seductively shaded the original "Richland Woman Blues" or "Midnight at the Oasis", but her voice is deeper and she commands a rasping growl-characteristics eminently suitable for the blues and gospel songs assembled here. The album's inspiration was a visit to the grave of the great guitar-playing blueswoman Memphis Minnie, and she selects four of her songs, two as conversational duets with Alvin Youngblood Hart and two with the artful guitar of Roy Rogers.